Earn Your Degree

If you like working with your hands and troubleshooting, and have a mechanical aptitude, a career as an electrician could be a sound choice. Demand for electrical workers has always been solid and is expected to grow in the foreseeable future. Completing the Associate degree program in Electrical Construction and Planning could help you find a new career in a highly competitive industry.

What You'll Learn

In Coyne College’s Electrical Construction and Planning program in Chicago, you’ll get the hands-on electrical training and individualized instruction you need to prepare for a career as an electrician. The Associate degree requires general education classes as well as some additional electrician courses not required in the diploma program. You can complete the program in as little as 78 weeks. Learn more about Associate’s degree electrician classes.

What You'll Do

Electricians install and maintain electrical devices and wiring in homes, factories, offices, and other structures. Upon completion of the electrician degree program, you’ll be prepared for a position as an entry-level electrician in electrical construction or maintenance.

Career Outlook

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, employment of electricians is expected to grow by 20%, much faster than the average for all occupations through 2022.

How to Become an Electrician

There isn’t much you can do in today’s world without electricity in one form or another. Electricity is the driving force behind technology and the conveniences of today’s world. It’s no surprise that technology in the modern home has opened the door wide open for skilled trades such as electricians. So it should come as no shock that electricians are in high demand.

An electrician is a tradesperson specializing in electrical wiring of buildings, stationary machines, and related equipment. Electricians may be employed in the installation of new electrical components or the maintenance and repair of existing electrical infrastructure.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, employment of electricians is expected to grow by 20%, much faster than the average for all occupations through 2022.

  1. Obtain an Associate Degree

  2. Complete an apprenticeship

  3. Obtain a state license